eBay and the small business exception

April 22, 2013

In an email Sunday to 40 million eBay users, eBay CEO John Donahoe urged them to oppose the Marketplace Fairness Act unless the small business exception, which exempts online retailers with less than $1 million in out-of-state sales from collecting sales tax, is raised to $10 million or 50 employees.

We’re all for making sure small online businesses don’t have to spend time or money dealing with sales tax (that’s why we created TaxCloud in the first place), but here are three reasons that raising the exemption threshold doesn’t make sense:

1. At the $1 million threshold, most online retailers are already exempt. Nationwide, fewer than 1000 online retailers* have more than $1 million in total sales. (If we consider only out-of-state sales, that figure is even lower.)

2. Collecting sales tax doesn’t require the resources of a large company. The Marketplace Fairness Act requires states to provide free sales tax software and services for online retailers, so online businesses wouldn’t need to spend anything to comply with the bill.

3. Most small online retailers already use e-commerce platforms, which can easily provide add-ons that handle sales tax, just as they provide for shipping—making sales tax collection easy for all their retailers at once. And we’d lay odds that once states can require online businesses to collect sales tax, that’s exactly what they’ll do.

By exempting online retailers with less than $1 million in out-of-state sales, the small business exception already does what it was designed to do: ensure that small online businesses are not burdened by online sales tax collection. But raising the exemption threshold to $10 million or 50 employees would be a mistake.

*According to Internet Retailer‘s Second 500 Guide, only the top 980 online retailers in the nation had over $1 million in sales in 2011.


Guest TaxGirl post: “Why I support the Marketplace Fairness Act”

August 27, 2012

Every August Forbes contributor Kelly Phillips Erb, who writes the TaxGirl blog, asks her readers to send in guest posts to be published while she’s on vacation.

This year she provided three topics for guest posts, including “Is it fair to require online retailers to collect and remit state sales tax?”

Sten R. Wilson has contributed a post on that topic titled “Why I support the Marketplace Fairness Act.” In it, Wilson, owner of a sheep farm in upstate New York, explains that for him, collecting sales tax has been made much easier by states’ simplification of sales tax laws (through the Streamlined Sales and Use Tax Agreement) and by automated sales tax management services.

He supports the Marketplace Fairness Act because it provides incentive for states to simplify their sales tax laws:

The combination of today’s freely available technology and states’ simplification efforts is a great benefit for small businesses like mine. It eliminates bureaucracy, promotes efficiency, and increases productivity and profitability. It makes dealing with sales tax much, much easier for small business owners.

Passage of S.1832 the Marketplace Fairness Act will prompt all states to simplify their sales tax laws. Therefore, I support the Marketplace Fairness Act.

We sincerely agree! Wilson’s perspective as a small business owner is an important one in the online sales tax collection debate, and one that we haven’t seen enough in the media. The post is definitely worth a look.


Small business owners quoted by Alliance for Main Street Fairness — including our CEO

August 1, 2012

We were excited to see FedTax’s CEO, David Campbell, quoted alongside two other business owners in a press release from the Alliance for Main Street Fairness.

The article includes quotes from Pete Sides, co-owner of Robert M. Sides Family Music Center in Williamsport, PA, and Steve Bercu, co-owner of BookPeople in Austin, TX, both of whom support online sales tax collection—and whose small businesses both collect and remit sales tax, proving just how easy it is. Said Steve Bercu, who also testified in today’s hearing before the Senate Commerce Committee:

Remitting sales tax from out-of-state customers is not that hard, and those perpetuating the myth that it’s wildly complicated and costly are simply trying to preserve the special treatment in the tax code they currently enjoy. Congress should level the playing field and let us all compete on price in a free market.

We’re proud to be making online sales tax collection easier and cheaper (free) for businesses big and small. Here’s what our CEO had to say to the Alliance for Main Street Fairness:

Today, keeping track of a few thousand local tax rates and filing requirements is not an insurmountable technical, administrative or financial burden. TaxCloud proves this point by calculating and collecting sales tax on any purchase for any tax jurisdiction in the United States in less than one second. The service is free to all retailers.

It’s great to see business owners speaking up for marketplace fairness and recognizing the role that TaxCloud and other sales tax management services play in making the playing field level for everyone.

We will post again on our report from the hearing floor.


Small business owner makes argument for online sales tax collection in NY Times

October 27, 2011
The New York Times: Small Business: "You're the Boss"

New York Times: Occupy Wall Street? Who Will Occupy Main Street?

There’s a terrific new post up on the New York Times‘ “You’re the Boss” blog. Written by Jay Goltz, a small business owner from Chicago, it makes a great argument for online sales tax collection.

We strongly urge you to read the entire post yourself, but we couldn’t help quoting from parts of it:

On browsing in local stores but buying online:

I have a friend who owns a shoe store, and he tells me that people come in all of the time, try on some shoes, spend half an hour with a member of the sales staff, and when they have made a choice they announce that they are going to order the shoes online — as if it is something to boast about. Boasting to your friends is one thing; boasting to someone who has just spent time trying to help you is rude at best. 

On the ultimate consequences of browsing locally but buying online:

What happens if your local retail stores become a showroom for online stores to such an extent that it forces them out of business? Are you perfectly happy not touching and trying out products? It has already happened with the closing of hundreds of Borders book stores. This is not a level playing field — and I say this as someone who has both retail outlets and substantial online sales.

It’s also happened with several Barnes and Noble locations. When one Manhattan location closed last year, the New York Times interviewed several browsers at the store, and most said they liked to visit the store but didn’t buy anything. They preferred to buy online.

On how the loss of sales tax revenues hurts communities:

Zappos does about $1 billion in sales every year. If Chicago represents 2 percent of the company’s business, that would be $20 million in annual sales. That represents about $2 million dollars of sales tax that the city no longer gets — and no longer gets to use to pay for police, firefighters, teachers and street repairs . . . . How much more is being lost on sales by Amazon (which owns Zappos) and all of the other online retailers?

The loss of sales tax, as well as the loss of the real estate and payroll taxes that those closed stores used to pay, is damaging your city and state. This is a zero-sum game. You may think that if a local store can’t compete with Zappos or Amazon, that’s the store’s problem. And you may be right. But why do the rules favor Zappos and Amazon? Not forcing them to collect sales tax has given them an unfair advantage that ultimately will force all of us to pay higher taxes to local governments.

On local stores and the community:

Saving money online can be a pleasure. But these local stores employ your friends and neighbors, spend millions of dollars in your community, and are hardly taking advantage of anyone. . . . Whether it is the local frame shop, furniture store, luggage store, florist, shoe store, bicycle shop, or eyeglass store, many are struggling. If they are doing well, they are not doing that well. Most stores are not ripping people off. They are trying to make a living, give service, support employees and pay taxes — and they are getting challenged by large companies that can buy cheaper but don’t necessarily provide better value.

This is a fantastic post, and we highly recommend that you head over to the New York Times and read the entire thing.