“Fair Is Fair”: A legal perspective on the Marketplace Acts

September 11, 2012

The latest issue of Shopping Center Legal Update, a “legal journal for the shopping center industry,” has an interesting article on the Marketplace Fairness Act, Marketplace Equity Act, and Main Street Fairness Act—the three bills currently before Congress that would each allow states to require online retailers to collect sales tax.

In the article, Brian D. Huben, a partner at the LA law firm Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP, provides a legal perspective on online sales tax collection. We were particularly interested in his analysis of the Supreme Court case Quill Corp. v. North Dakota (1992). That case is responsible for the current rules about sales tax that govern online shopping, and this is the first place we’ve seen its details explained by a legal expert.

We found this part of the article, which quotes the dissenting opinion in Quill, particularly enlightening:

Some say that the past is prologue. Justice Byron Raymond “Whizzer” White, who dissented in Quill, presciently noted that “an out-of-state seller in a neighboring State could be the dominant business in the putative taxing State, creating the greatest infrastructure burdens and undercutting the State’s home companies by its comparative price advantage in selling products free of use taxes, and yet not have to collect such taxes if it lacks a physical presence in the taxing State.” Quill Corp., 504 U.S. at 328 – 329. While the stakes in Quill were decidedly smaller, the $23 billion in uncollected sales and use tax revenue cannot be ignored.

While fairly brief, this article is a great source for those interested in today’s online sales tax rules, how they came to be, and why some are arguing for change.