Internet retailers will have to collect sales tax, with or without the Marketplace Fairness Act

Among opponents of the Marketplace Fairness Act, there is a sense that if they succeed in blocking the bill, online retailers won’t have to collect sales tax.

Not so.

First, online retailers already have to collect sales tax for any state where they have nexus, defined as a physical presence. Warehouses and offices definitely fit the requirement, but some states also require any retailer selling at a fair or convention to collect sales tax.

More importantly, states can pass their own online sales tax laws. While the Supreme Court’s ruling in Quill v. North Dakota says that states can only require retailers with nexus to collect sales tax, states have been pushing against the edges of that ruling for some time by redefining “nexus.”

Affiliate nexus laws have been perhaps states’ most popular tool. These laws redefine “nexus” to include any retailer with a marketing affiliate located in the state. New York famously used an affiliate nexus law to get Amazon to collect New York sales tax, and with the court’s March ruling that the law can stand, more and more states are following its lead—most recently Kansas and New Mexico. West Virginia has gone even further by saying that having an individual perform services or solicit business in the state also qualifies a retailer for nexus. What is meant by “services” and “solicit” has yet to be defined.

The use of a drop shipper can also trigger a requirement to collect sales tax. If a customer and drop shipper are located in the same state, sales tax must be collected on the purchase—no matter where the retailer is located.

States are hurting for funds, and they aren’t going to ignore the $11 billion in sales tax that a University of Tennessee study found is going uncollected. If federal legislation doesn’t pass, they will continue to enact their own laws, increasing the number of retailers with nexus in the state and who therefore must collect sales tax.

Unfortunately for retailers, that means a nationwide patchwork of sales tax laws to navigate, all with varying requirements and definitions.

The Marketplace Fairness Act, in contrast, requires states to simplify and standardize their sales tax rules, so it will be easier for a retailer to collect sales tax for multiple states. And with this legislation in place, states will have no reason to pass their own laws aimed at getting online retailers to collect sales tax.

One Response to Internet retailers will have to collect sales tax, with or without the Marketplace Fairness Act

  1. marketplace fair says:

    Let the states do their own dirty work and keep the Fed Govt our of it. Nexus is a perfectly fine solution. Physical presence is the only standard that is constitutional and “fair”. Fundamentally unfair to force companies to collect and remit sales taxes in states where they have to physical presence, voting rights or political representation.

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