New York Times speaks out for sales tax fairness

The New York Times editorial board today made a persuasive case for online sales tax. It’s a simple matter of fairness, the piece says, and it goes on to point out why the Marketplace Fairness Act works as legislation:

The bill would not impose new taxes but would enable collection of taxes already due under state laws. It also overcomes the objection that sales-tax collection would be too difficult for online retailers. It requires states . . . to harmonize their sales-tax rules (24 states already have) . . . . It also requires states to provide tax-collection software . . . at no cost, which many already do. [emphasis ours]

Interestingly, the Times finds the $1 million small seller exception—which we’ve seen little criticism of elsewhere—to be unfair to small bricks-and-mortar retailers. But they rightly point out that including the $1 million exception is a matter of political expedience:

Unfortunately, the bill exempts retailers who have under $1 million in Internet sales from the collection requirement. That perpetuates the problem, because a bricks-and-mortar retailer is not exempt based on total sales. As a political concession to win swift passage, however, the exemption is acceptable as long as lawmakers commit to continued efforts to level the playing field.

It’s great to see the New York Times speak out so forcefully and cogently in favor of sales tax fairness. Given last Friday’s vote of 75-24 in support of the Marketplace Fairness Act, it seems most members of Congress agree!

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