Facts on Main Street Fairness Act and Streamlined Sales Tax, including job figures

We recommend our readers take a look at two sources of thorough backgrounds on the Main Street Fairness Act, the Streamlined Sales and Use Tax Agreement, and online sales tax collection in general.

A fact sheet issued by the International Council of Shopping Centers is worth reading in its entirety, but we were particularly interested in some of the statistics it includes, which we hadn’t seen before:

  • One of out every 11 U.S. jobs is shopping center-related; for every 100 individuals directly employed at regional shopping centers, an additional 20 – 30 are supported in the community due to multiplier effects
  • Each $1 million of new retail sales adds 3.61 jobs. To illustrate: 
    • $1 million in new sales at Best Buy’s average e-commerce and B&M shares is expected to create 3.47 jobs;
    • The same $1 million in new sales at Amazon’s average is expected to create 0.88 jobs.

Again, it’s definitely worth reading the entire fact sheet. The simple bulleted arrangement is surprisingly effective, and with each fact, the implicit argument for the Main Street Fairness Act becomes stronger and stronger.

The other piece is an article by Sylvia Dion at allBusiness (we blogged about an earlier article of hers on the Main Street Fairness Act). This time she focuses on the Streamlined Sales and Use Tax Agreement (SSUTA) and how it works in the Main Street Fairness Act. Unlike any other article we’ve seen on the subject, this one discusses SSUTA’s small seller exception:

One definition, not elaborated on in the legislation, but found in the SSUTA, is the small seller exception. Cory Barwick, Lead Tax Analyst at CCH -a Wolters-Kluwer business, explains that the SSUTA’s small seller exception “allows businesses with less than $500,000 in annual revenue to be exempt from the remote (out-of-state) seller collection requirement.” According to Barwick, who reports on Streamlined Sales Tax developments for SalesTaxSupport.com, “the Streamlined Sales Tax Governing Board has made many revisions to the SSUTA since its inception in an effort to entice states to become members to the agreement, including the November 2010 update to the small seller exception,” which he adds, “makes sense as these businesses are the ones that generally cannot afford the expense associated with the collection of remote taxes.”

Of course, we feel that collecting sales tax online shouldn’t cost businesses anything, which is why we’ve made TaxCloud free to all retailers. But if small businesses are concerned about the potential costs of online sales tax collection, the small seller exception should put them at ease.

Dion also makes it clear that the Main Street Fairness Act is not a nationwide “Amazon tax”:

By the way, although the proposed Main Street Fairness legislation and the state “Amazon laws” have a similar goal—to require the collection of sales tax by out-of-state sellers who do not have a physical presence in their statethe Main Street legislation is not a national “Amazon law.”  These state laws are presumptive nexus laws, meaning that if a business engages in the activity described in the law, a presumption of “nexus” arises. Nexus, an oft overused term, means that a business has established a sufficient connection to a state to allow that state to subject the business to taxation or, in the case of sales tax, to impose a sales tax collection requirement. State “Amazon laws” focus on an expanded view of nexusin essence, that the use of in-state “affiliates” who post a web-link to the out-of-state seller’s on-line store is akin to creating a physical presence in the state.
But the Main Street Fairness legislation makes no mention of nexus. What’s key here is that states must be full-member SSUTA states in order to have the right to assert a collection requirement on out-of-state sellers. Essentially, the use of in-state “affiliates” that refer customers to an out-of-state seller via a web-link becomes irrelevant under the Main Street legislation.

In other words, under the Main Street Fairness Act, there would be no need for retailers like Amazon and O.co (formerly Overstock.com) to drop their affiliates—no need for states to pass sales tax laws focused on affiliates in the first place.

We have to disagree with Dion on one subject, though. At the end of the article, she asserts that the Main Street Fairness Act doesn’t have bipartisan support. We disagree. While the official sponsors of the bill are Democrats, numerous Republican politicians have voiced their support for this legislation—among them, Senator John Boozman, Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam, and Indiana State Senator Luke Kenley. There is absolutely nothing partisan about the Main Street Fairness Act—it doesn’t create a new tax or raise taxes; it simply ensures all retailers follow the same sales tax rules; and it gives states complete control over their own sales tax laws—and we believe that we’ll see more and more Republicans voicing support for the bill in the days to come.

One Response to Facts on Main Street Fairness Act and Streamlined Sales Tax, including job figures

  1. Ted L. Johnson says:

    Those who have the influence and money to lobby Congress are not the small main street businesses that Senator Boozman uses for his support. It is Walmart, Target, and many other large named online retailers that will benefit in their online sales. It is the small in home individual who has taken the initiative to create a website and sell their craft or goods who will suffer. Once again our Representatives show their self serving support of the big money interests.

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s