MA Committee on Revenue endorses bill to join Streamlined

According to a State House News Service article in the Boston Herald, Massachusett’s Committee on Revenue last week endorsed a state bill that would allow Massachusetts join the Streamlined Sales and Use Tax Agreement (SSUTA).

Although the article refers to the bill as H 3672, our research shows that H 3672 is a bill on accessible housing for people with disabilities. It’s our guess that this is simply a typo in the article and that the actual bill the Committee on Revenue approved is H 3673, a revision of H 1695 that the committee “reported favorably” on August 15 and that aims to “promote sales tax fairness for Main Street retailers.” H 3673 would “authorize the commissioner to petition the Streamlined Sales Tax Governing Board to allow the commonwealth to become an associate or full member of the Streamlined Sales Tax Governing Board.”

We strongly support the commonwealth’s efforts to simplify and standardize their sales and use tax laws by joining SSUTA—we even went up to Boston in April to testify in support of the bill. Our testimony read, in part:

This bill is very important to alleviate the imbalance being felt by local retailers across the state, as increasingly they are seeing consumers browse their stores and ask clerks questions, only to go home and buy from online retailers to save on sales tax. Over time, the vanishing sales tax revenue has hurt not only the state, which is losing the sales tax proceeds, and local retailers, who are losing business, but even Massachusetts residents themselves, as the loss of sales tax revenue has resulted in dramatic cuts to local services, including police protection, fire protection, and schools.

In addition, by adopting this legislation Massachusetts would send a clear message to Washington, D.C., that it is time for federal action to correct the growing inequity between local retailers that have to collect sales tax and online retailers that do not. It’s time to shift the burden of calculating, reporting, and remitting tax on online purchases from individual consumers to online retailers. It’s time for local communities to start receiving the sales tax revenue they are due, so they can stop cutting services because of lack of funds. It’s time to recognize that collecting sales tax on online purchases is fair, easy, and the right thing to do. It’s time to pass the Main Street Fairness Act.

True, joining SSUTA is just a first step toward resolving the unfair practice of requiring local small businesses to collect sales tax while not requiring the same of larger, and frequently more technologically sophisticated, out-of-state retailers. It’s only a first step, but it’s a crucial step. Momentum on this issue is building, and Massachusetts now has the opportunity to stand united with twenty-four other states and say that the problem of uncollected sales tax, which affects nearly every state in the nation, needs a national solution, and that national solution has been provided by SSUTA.

If Massachusetts does become the latest state to join the Streamlined Sales and Use Tax Agreement, it would simplify Massachusetts’ sales tax regulations, making it easier for businesses (particularly those outside Massachusetts) to collect Massachusetts sales tax.

We applaud the Committee on Revenue for approving this sensible legislation, and we hope to see Joint Committee on Rules show the same wisdom. We look forward to the Bay State  becoming the 25th member of the Streamlined Sales and Use Tax Agreement.

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