New Mexico and Mississippi join the list of states considering affiliate nexus legislation

New Mexico representative Eleanor Chavez introduced HB 102, affiliate nexus tax legislation, on January 20, 2011. It expands the definition of “engaging in business” in New Mexico as follows:

C. A person with a business with no physical presence in New Mexico is presumed to be engaging in business in New Mexico and has nexus with the state for purposes of due process and interstate commerce if:

(1) that person enters into an agreement with an affiliate physically present in New Mexico, for a commission or other consideration, to directly or indirectly refer potential customers, whether by link or an internet web site or otherwise, to that person; and

(2) the cumulative gross receipts from sales by that person to customers physically present in New Mexico who are referred to that person by all affiliates with an agreement described in this subsection are in excess of ten thousand dollars ($10,000) during the preceding twelve-month period ending on June 30 of any year.

D. The presumption of nexus established in Subsection C of this section may be rebutted by proof that the affiliate made no solicitation in the state that would satisfy the nexus requirements of the United States constitution on behalf of the person presumed to be engaging in business in New Mexico.

In Mississippi, HB 363 was proposed by Representative Jessica Sibley Upshaw. The bill’s description is:  Use tax; provide that person soliciting remote sales through representatives in this state is subject to use tax. Specifically, “A person is presumed to be soliciting or transacting business by an independent contractor, agent, or other representative if the person enters into an agreement with a resident of this state under which the resident, for a commission or other consideration, directly or indirectly refers potential customers, whether by a link on an Internet website or otherwise, to the person.”

The list of states considering affiliate nexus tax legislation is growing longer—evidence that, absent federal legislation, states are willing to take matters into their own hands to increase the collection of sales tax due on internet transactions. It also seems that the general level of knowledge about the issues—and about the pros and cons of various approaches—is increasing. Recent editorials in two Chicago newspapers (the Tribune and the State Journal-Register) highlighted the affiliate nexus legislation passed by the Illinois House and Senate—and both pointed out the shortcomings of this type of legislation and the need for a federal solution.

One Response to New Mexico and Mississippi join the list of states considering affiliate nexus legislation

  1. […] all have affiliate nexus legislation on the books, while California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, New Mexico, and Texas have all introduced similar legislation this year. (Mississippi also introduced similar […]

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s