Editorial: Florida (and the country) needs online sales tax collection

We were thrilled to see this editorial from the Tallahassee Democrat (reprinted on the News-Press.com website), which makes one of the strongest, most cogent arguments for online sales tax collection that we’ve ever read. We urge you to read the entire editorial, but here’s part of it:

State Rep. Michelle Rehwinkel Vasilinda reminds – or attempts to remind – her tax-resistant colleagues in the Florida Legislature that collecting a sales tax on purchases made online is not the same as raising taxes.

Raising money, yes, but as Rehwinkel Vasilinda put it at the end of last session, “The concept of leaving tax revenue on the table, especially when we really need it, is really irksome.”

Taxes should be collected on purchases from online merchants, the same as purchases in brick-and-mortar shops, which suffer from this not-so-level playing field of commerce. Business groups such as Associated Industries of Florida and the Florida Retail Federation would like to see the disparity addressed.

It’s not just the tax avoidance that’s a problem for local merchants. In many cases local stores end up functioning as a showroom for online shoppers who like to look at the merchandise in person, but buy it online where there’s no sales tax.

But because online sales cross state boundaries and tax rates vary so much nationwide, a meaningful online sales tax would be most effectively and uniformly collected under federal legislation.

This clear-sighted editorial ends with an endorsement of both the Main Street Fairness Act and the Streamlined Sales and Use Tax Agreement (SSUTA). SSUTA was created by forty-four states and the business community to simplify sales tax collection and make it easier for businesses to collect sales tax. The Main Street Fairness Act would allow states that have adopted SSUTA’s guidelines to require all retailers, whether in-state or out-of-state, to collect sales tax on purchases made by state residents.

Last spring, Rehwinkel Vasilinda, D-Tallahassee, sponsored HB 455 to have Florida join the agreement, and Sen. Evelyn Lynn, R-Daytona Beach, sponsored the companion SB 1548. Neither moved forward, though perhaps now, with this umbrella effort in Congress gathering steam, Florida lawmakers will join the 23 states that have joined the coalition.

Roughly 1,400 retailers already collect sales tax in those “streamlined” states on a voluntary basis.

They’ve remitted more than $700 million to their respective states, yet estimates are that the actual amount lost could be as much as $23 billion by 2012.

This legislation is overdue in Congress, and the collection of this tax is critical to Florida, which needs to join the future and work to close this unfair tax loophole here.

To those who have said that online sales tax collection is not a bipartisan issue: Note that the measure to have Florida join SSUTA was introduced in the Florida Senate by a Republican and in the House by a Democrat.

In an article on another Florida website, Matthew Falconer, who is running for mayor of Orange County (FL), also points out that the Main Street Fairness Act is a bipartisan issue and offers a way to combat the false perception that it increases taxes:

Not surprisingly there is support for the bill on a state level by Republicans and Democrats alike. Even Jeb Bush supports some type of internet sales tax. There are complications to the collection procedures but the technology exists to address those problems. The obstacle to the internet sales tax collection problem is political. It is seen as a tax increase which is taboo for Republicans.

The easy solution to that problem, again supported by Jeb Bush, is to reduce taxes by the same amount of the increased revenue from internet sales tax collection. This does not create additional taxes but levels the playing field between brick and mortar stores, the ones that employee our neighbors, and on line retailers (many of which are based in other countries).

Other politicians have also suggested that if sales tax were collected online, other taxes could be eliminated. As we blogged about recently, Indiana State Senator Luke Kenley and West Virginia delegate John Doyle have said that if online retailers collected sales tax for their states, the inheritance tax or the groceries tax (respectively) could be eliminated.

We have long said that online sales tax collection is a bipartisan issue, one that should matter to anyone who cares about fairness and tax equality. We’re glad to see that politicians on both sides of the aisle agree.

6 Responses to Editorial: Florida (and the country) needs online sales tax collection

  1. […] Although Florida’s recent bill to join SSUTA stalled, we would urge Florida lawmakers to pass that bill, and soon. Not only will it make it easier for businesses to collect Florida sales tax, but it will also put Florida in the perfect position to require all online retailers to collect sales tax when the Main Street Fairness Act—which now has the full support of California and Amazon behind it—becomes law. […]

  2. […] (as our regular readers know, we come down firmly on the side of “yes,” for many good reasons), whether or not online purchases should be subject to sales tax is not in question. They […]

  3. […] to mention all the Republican supporter in state legislatures, such as Luke Kenley (IN) and Evelyn Lynn (FL), to name just two). We think that once hard facts overcome all the inflammatory rhetoric about […]

  4. […] a previous blog post, we pointed to a great Tallahassee Democrat editorial praising Vasilinda. Unfortunately the […]

  5. […] federal legislation allowing states to require online retailers to collect sales tax, for [many] [good] [reasons]. Share […]

  6. […] Otter joins many other lawmakers in voicing his support for online sales tax collection. And we’re pleased to note […]

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